For all you gearheads and electrical geeks...

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I need yo helpeh!

So basically whats going on is I want to supercharge my ATV engine by using a vacuum motor from an Oreck vacuum that nobody uses anymore...

The problem: I need a 120 volt electrical source to power the motor, and a 12 volt battery wont do the trick. (as far as i know of...)

The question: Anyone know how i could wire up that motor to the 12v car battery so it'll run?

Help would be greatly appreciated. XD
 
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**** i love you right now.

Thanks alot, im gonna go buy one of these puppies ASAP.
 
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Yeah.. its a quad.

And i cant do this. I tried it hooked up to the wall and it was pushing out so much air that it made my engine go unstable and it spiked the RPM's to about 9000....

Then it wouldnt shut off. Im surprised my engine didnt blow.
 
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It was... and even worse is that i forgot to connect the kill switch... so i had no way to shut it off but choke the carbuerator.

****'s scary =P haha
 
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Sounds like your giving it too much power. There is more to it than just volts. You have to worry about Amps and wattage in the end too. Lower the amps and you get less watts, which means you decrease the amount of power.

Look at it like it's one of these vacuum cleaners (wait..you are using a vacuum cleaner) In Europe, quite a lot of our vacuum cleaners have switches on them to lower the wattage. My vacuum cleaner has a max power of 1400 watt (it's running on 230volts so that means it will use 7,61 Amps (I(a) = 1400/(230*0,8))), but if I turn the switch to half power, it will only use 700 watts, have half the amount of revs. It still runs on those 230 volts, but a variabel resistor will 'resist' the power of the electric current, and thus will use only half the amps, and decrease the power.

From what I understand (I'm not too sure about this though) your car battery gives you 25 amps. Which would equal to 120*25*0,8=2400 watts. Which is quite a lot. So you might want to lower the amps on it.

To do that, you need a resistor:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Resistor


But that is where you lose me, because I have absolutely no idea how you would build that in a vacuum cleaner. You need some who is a bit more practical instead of theoretical for that.
 
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Why decrease the power, when you can increase the POWER!!!!! MUAHAHAHAHHAHAHHAHAAHAHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHhH!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
 
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Deco... that made NO sense bud. I dont know if you're trying to play along with what Lionheart said, but i don't get it.

@Sicron - I think I'm just going to abandon the whole thing... Even if i do get the "supercharger" (aka - vacuum cleaner motor) spitting out the right amount of air that i want, I'll have to re-jet the carburetor to get more fuel to go in the engine to keep it from stalling. When i do that... it brings in heat issues. I have an air cooled engine, and I'm pretty sure that if i do all this, it'll make my engine run red hot... which will destroy my rings, piston and my cylinder... and lead to blowing my seals and bearings. In order to counteract that, i need water cooling.. which could cost hundreds or maybe thousands of dollars.



Basically put... it's just not practical.... so I'm going to abandon this project and see if I can squeeze more horsepower out of my engine.

Any ideas guys?
 
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Sounds like your giving it too much power. There is more to it than just volts. You have to worry about Amps and wattage in the end too. Lower the amps and you get less watts, which means you decrease the amount of power.

Look at it like it's one of these vacuum cleaners (wait..you are using a vacuum cleaner) In Europe, quite a lot of our vacuum cleaners have switches on them to lower the wattage. My vacuum cleaner has a max power of 1400 watt (it's running on 230volts so that means it will use 7,61 Amps (I(a) = 1400/(230*0,8))), but if I turn the switch to half power, it will only use 700 watts, have half the amount of revs. It still runs on those 230 volts, but a variabel resistor will 'resist' the power of the electric current, and thus will use only half the amps, and decrease the power.

From what I understand (I'm not too sure about this though) your car battery gives you 25 amps. Which would equal to 120*25*0,8=2400 watts. Which is quite a lot. So you might want to lower the amps on it.

To do that, you need a resistor:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Resistor


But that is where you lose me, because I have absolutely no idea how you would build that in a vacuum cleaner. You need some who is a bit more practical instead of theoretical for that.
You get it wrong. A device will just take the amount of amps dependend on it's internal resistance and the voltage you supply to it (ohms law). Batteries usually don't indicate amps, maybe max amps (after wich it will catch fire or something). Typically you see something like amps/hour, which indicates how long the battery will last supplying a certain amount of amps. If you connect a 120 V motor to a 120V battery or wall plug, the same amount of current will flow, no matter the maximum amp capacities of the battery or your local power plant.
 

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