So, I started learning how to OC from the BIOS...

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I have an AMD Athlon II x2 255 CPU and from what I understand these are good overclockers. So, I decided one day that I want to get my CPU from it's stock 3.1Ghz to 3.5Ghz.
With 0 knowledge about the BIOS I started watching some video tutorials on how to enter the bios and how to use it. So, I rebooted my PC, pressed the Delete button and entered the bios. But with my motherboard's bios being different from the ones I saw in the tutorials I didn't know what everything else was except the CPU Frequency and the CPU Clock Ratio. So I tried raising the frequency by 10 to see what would happen and after I saved and booted I saw in CPU-z that I managed to overclock my CPU to 3.2Ghz. After some testing I saw that the OC was stable so I went back to increase it some more. This time I raised the frequency to 214 in order to get to 3.3Ghz but when I saved and rebooted my PC failed to boot. I went back, lowered the frequency back to 210 and everything worked just fine again.
And this is where I'm stuck now. I think I have to raise the core voltage but I don't know witch one it is and by how much I have to raise it.



Can you guys help me learn how to use this thing? Thanks.
 
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If you raise core voltage you must also raise cooling efficiency. This means buying a water cooling kit, or a serious aftermarket active heat sink fan. You also need to have high quality filtering of your electrical signal. Your Memory Clock and Hyper Transport Clock rates are raising as you crank up your Front Side Bus, these parts don't always like FSB increases if your electricity is "noisy". This usually requires a very stable and clean power happy PSU. You may need to decrease your HT multiplier and Mem Clock multiplier if they can't handle the extra speed. Remember that any over clocking can damage your machine for very little gain. If OCing is what you want to do, you should look into black edition parts, which have superior binning, so you can play game to your hearts content, like controlling the CPU's Multiplier.

PCIE Clock is another thing you want to make sure stays in range.
 
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Well, then the PSU must be my problem since I have some crappy 360W PSU that came with the case. The cooling will not be a problem any time soon because I have a 120mm fan blowing air directly onto the CPU cooler. It might be a stock cooler but it keeps my temps at around 42°C under full load.
 
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You'll need better cooling than that if you OC the cpu. More power>more heat.
 

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