wingless electromagnetic air vehicle

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It could work in theory. But the question is how much energy would it actually eat up to ionize the air to make a force strong enough to propell a craft alone and not even including passengers.

Its a great jump forward from using fuel though.


I do remember seeing a movie about one experiment in a similar nature though. Exept they used a laser to heat up the bottom of the saucer so much that the ir below it exploded. It was only a small test model though.
 
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Its a great jump forward from using fuel though.
Wrong. It still uses fuel indirectly.

Oh btw: in before someone says Flying saucers are real and this news is just fabricated so we don't scratch our heads when we see them.
 
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Wrong. It still uses fuel indirectly.

Oh btw: in before someone says Flying saucers are real and this news is just fabricated so we don't scratch our heads when we see them.
Sorry for the bad wording. I ment cherosine nat fuel in general. But since they need something that provides electricity then hydrogen is a better choice for fuel then the current jet fuel.
 
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It's a great discovery in science, i hope it will work well!
 
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Well in theory it should work. But as said, the power supply is the biggest issue. To have a constant supply of enough power to ionize air would require a lot of juce.
 
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Well in theory it should work. But as said, the power supply is the biggest issue. To have a constant supply of enough power to ionize air would require a lot of juce.
Maybe a nuclear powered ship?:)
 
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That depends. Does Dark Matter really exist? I think it does. But if it does exist pretty much anywhere in the universe the same way air exists on our planet. What properties does the Dark Matter have? Can it also be ionized in a certain way?
Didn't they recently discover that dark matter was actually web-like strands of stuff weaved amd stretched across the Universe?

Cool prospect though.
 
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if its physical, in any way, it can be broken down. so it can be used as energy.

but what happens when you use it...? i cant think destroying an adhesive to a very tightly stretched substance can end well.
 
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Maybe a nuclear powered ship?:)
Stupid idea. Atleast untill nuclear powered means having to drag round a couple of tons of reactor weight.

The reactor is just to heavy. They need something powerfull and as light as possible.
 
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Didn't they recently discover that dark matter was actually web-like strands of stuff weaved amd stretched across the Universe?

Cool prospect though.
As far as I know, dark matter is just the umbrelly term for all the mass of the universe that should be there, but we can't see/detect it yet.
It was coined because scientist calculated from the age and expansion of the universe how much matter there should be for it not to collapse.

So that thing does not work in space/vacuum. Ion engines are currently the most efficient thing usable in space.
 
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Cool, a large scale extension of an existing phenomena. Seen the small scale stuff before - run a large current through a metal ring and it will fly by ionising the air in and around it. Its interesting that such greater masses can still achieve lift this way. Still dont see how it is a practical invention though, for widespread use at least, would simply chew too much energy imo.
 
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You'd have to go far more advance for an efficient engine thn a nuclear reactor. You'd need something in the line of an Matter/Anti-matter reactor. They would be relatively light and give massive energy. 1kg matter and 1kg anti-matter would give a reaction equal to about 47 megatons of TNT. And yes, that is quite a lot. The problem at the moment is though that it is incredibly hard to create anti-matter. It probably takes a hundred more times more energy to create one anti-proton than you'd get by joining a proton and anti-proton. Then there is to problem of the storage of the anti-matter, it's hard to store unless it's inside a special magnetic field. Then again, anti-protons tend to go haywire, due to their negative nature, when inside the field. So you'd need Anti-Hydrogen, a neutral anti matter, for that...which is even harder to create.

Well you get the point. We are not nearly close enough to put stuff like this to good use in space.
 
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You'd have to go far more advance for an efficient engine thn a nuclear reactor. You'd need something in the line of an Matter/Anti-matter reactor. They would be relatively light and give massive energy. 1kg matter and 1kg anti-matter would give a reaction equal to about 47 megatons of TNT. And yes, that is quite a lot. The problem at the moment is though that it is incredibly hard to create anti-matter. It probably takes a hundred more times more energy to create one anti-proton than you'd get by joining a proton and anti-proton. Then there is to problem of the storage of the anti-matter, it's hard to store unless it's inside a special magnetic field. Then again, anti-protons tend to go haywire, due to their negative nature, when inside the field. So you'd need Anti-Hydrogen, a neutral anti matter, for that...which is even harder to create.

Well you get the point. We are not nearly close enough to put stuff like this to good use in space.
None of that is even close to being relevant. A nuclear engine would be all the power the ship would need, but there's one problem. It'd be ****ing nuclear powered.
 

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