Scientists evolve single-celled organism into multi-cellur organism

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A good read. The criticisms are well placed, Fungus frequently operates as a colony, blurring the line between multi and single cell organisms. Had these been simple bacteria or archaea with no multi-cellular history, the experment would have had huge implications.
 
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A good read. The criticisms are well placed, Fungus frequently operates as a colony, blurring the line between multi and single cell organisms. Had these been simple bacteria or archaea with no multi-cellular history, the experment would have had huge implications.
yes....

whatever he said.
 
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The critic's response could be used to explain how humans growing wings is perfectly normal, as well (we have a lot of DNA that isn't strictly speaking "human" in our DNA. In fact, less than 10% of our DNA determines who we are). Regardless of "history", this is quite impressive, as it is another stepping stone to our understanding of evolutionary biology.
 
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Indeed, most of our DNA isn't actively used - pretty much leftovers. The experiment with algae should be interesting, it has no "memory" to go by.
 

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