GeForce GTS450

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Thank you for posting guys... anyway I don't give much info. last time such as System Specs or anything about the GPU, so... my System Specs are theese...
CPU: AMD Athlon™ 64 X2 Dual Core Processor 4400+, 2301 MHz
RAM: 3 GB DDR2 800 MHz
MB: Asus M2V MX SE

BTW. I tryed GTS450 2048 MB DDR3 (Point of View) and it was such a slow GPU... the Memory bandwidth was 17.3 GB/s... slow DDR3 Card :S
So im gona take GTS459 1024 GDDR5 (Asus) and I want to ask will CPU or MB give me bottleneck on this GPU? Thanks in advanced ;)

Edit: I've seen in the posts and the GPU has 128-bit Memory Bus ;)
 
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Yes, your CPU is - unfortunately - quite slow compared to more recent models. I have the "sister CPU" 4200+ right here and it really can't compete, unfortunately. It sure is enough for most games, but not at max details, far from it. Serious Sam BFE wasn't playable, Bad Company 2 is about as good as it gets. The GPU in my setup is a 8800 GT. And it's definitely not the limiting component. ;)
I've used it before with my Q6600 @ 3 GHz, which got me way better results.
 
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I just do not recommend that GTS450 card, GTX460 is 2x better solution, I suggest you add few bucks to your budget and buy a good card or wait for the price to drop, the more you wait the less you pay, it is like that with tech stuff in this world.

http://www.gpureview.com/show_cards.php?card1=634&card2=632

I also suggest Ati 5750 (I have that one now, it runs pretty good on high settings) or better 5770, those are pretty good budget cards atm.
 
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Either choice is a total waste with his current system. Of course he could just upgrade some time later and keep using the card, but if he doesn't plan to...
 
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I've decided on going all out when doing an upgrade instead of the minimalistic approach. And I am loving that reasoning so far. My system will probably end up being more cost productive in the long run. Ofcourse, I understand not everyone can cough up the dough instantaneously. But in that case again I'd rather save up for the big one.
 
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So guys... I canceled GTS450 GDDR5... now I want to buy HD 6770 GDDR5... but I have a 400w PSU... so I don't know it will run well :/ Recommended is 450w PSU
 
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I would actually go well above the recommended, since they don't really know what extra components you have that will use the power. I'd say about 500-600w should do it.
 
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IT depends on the PSU. A quality PSU of 400w would be enough.

I have a friend who runs a 2600K @ 4.8GHZ, and a GTX580, upped V-Core, 8GB of RAm, and all the little fans and a few HDD's on a 460w SeaSonic. It depends on it's rating. Most people vastly over-rate HOW much of PSU they need. For example, my rig needed 500-550w. I bought 850w, mainly cause of a killer deal, plus I can go SLi in the future and have plenty of breathing room.

http://psucalc.net/

This little program here is developed by a guy who has spend quite literally, thousands of hours researching PSU's. This guy has like 20 topics that are 9 pages long of him talking about PSU's, and he just made this program. It's pretty good, I'd give it a try.

0.96snip.JPG
 
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IT depends on the PSU. A quality PSU of 400w would be enough.
I've told you this before, and I'm about to tell you this again:

You're an idiot.

The more wattage your system has to go on, the less likely it is to have problems (all systems have spikes and various issues like that, nothing is entirely stable). The smart move with a PSU is to buy relatively big, and buy high quality. A 1000 W PSU of good quality won't be outdated for at least five years. Maybe ten, depending on how things change. A 400 W PSU of any quality would have to be replaced within three years time if you want to buy new components.

Usually there are few major breakthroughs with PSUs, and the requirements aren't really very likely to rise above 1000 W even in a long time. It's one of the few components that doesn't require constant updating, so it's one you want to spend on.
 
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And I'm talking about his current rig, not future rig. And use a PSU for 10 years? Capacitors age. You lose about 5-7% of your wattage per year. So yes, buying more is always a good idea, however, I was merely explained that yes, it is possible.
 
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a) source please
b) if you lose 5-7% each year, then a 400W PSU will be even more worthless next year than the year you bought it, and you'll risk major problems with your hardware

"I was merely explained"

... Really?
 
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Oh wow, I made a mistake, good job.

http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/304617-28-electrolytic-capacitor-aging

Ignore the fact that it's Toms Hardware.

lectrolytic capacitor aging. When used heavily or over an extended period of time (1+ years) a PSU will slowly lose some of its initial wattage capacity. We recommend you add 20% if you plan to keep your PSU for more than 1 year, or 25-30% for 24/7 usage and 1+ years.
Regardless, they were looking for a cheap build to just get them by is all.
 
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Considering that my information is from:

a) Studying materials, energy, and nanotechnology
b) Computer engineers with years of experience

and that yours is from:

a) A forum

And that you don't even bother specifying the useful links in said forum...

It's probably wiser to get a good PSU now.

One of the links in your shiny forum linked to a half-way credible .pdf that stated maximum service life was 15 years according to a series of formulas (though this may apply only to one brand, and it definitely only applies to aluminum capacitors).
 

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