Banning fashion labels. Is it going too far?

~Gurbir~
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Resently here in Vancouver, Canada, there have been more and more reports of gang violence, especially on Granville Street. Granville Street, is probably the most popular loction in downtown Vancouver due to its shops, clubs, restaurants etc.

Anyway, I recently heard on a local radio station, that people wearing certain clothing labels are either are not allowed in or are pulled out of clubs and pretty much interrogated on the spot.

The questions they are being asked are things like, "how do you afford these types of clothes" obviously implying somthing illegal. If any tattoos are seen they are asked "what the tattoo means" for example a local DJ was going to his car after a gig. Police followed him to his car and started questioning him, because of the clothes he was wearing, the tattoos he had(they even made him lift his shirt so the could the rest of them) and the car he drives. He has also been denied access to certain clubs he was supposed to Dj in because of a shirt he was wearing.

The local law enforcment officers have denied ever pulling people out of clubs and whatnot, but numerous witnesses would say otherwise.

The black listed labels(considered "gangster-wear") supposedly link the people who wear them to certain criminal organizations/gangs.

Im all for stopping gang violence but, is it really necessary to give someone the third degree because of the clothes they wear? What's next?:scared:

here's an article related to this topic.
some of the labels are mentioned in this article.

http://www.nowpublic.com/culture/vancouver-bc-fashion-labels-blacklisted-clubs
 
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While I do agree that it's a drastic measure, clothing does make the man (or woman) and it does help 'catagorize' people. It makes it easier to tell what group they're a part of.

At least they're doing it to stop crime, which is something everyone benefits from.
 
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That's called "a dresscode" and some clubs/bars/restaurants don't allow for certain clothing because they don't want the type of people that usually wear those clothes to hang around in their facility. I once got denied entrance to a club because I had long hair and wearing DC Shoes, pretty ****ty if you're out on a night with friends. In the end I just went to the metalbar down the road, but still.

But I agree with this all tbh. If I had a bar and some people come in with gangstah ghettopimp clothing going all "y00 m0mma dawg ***** what?!!?", I'd kick them out as well, because you just know they'll be pricks.
 
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I think it's just using stereotypes. I mean it'd be like saying that all black people are criminals.
The only difference is that it uses clothes to generalize.

Edit: My post is directed to that police thingy. Dresscode in bars/clubs ,while being stereotypical too, is not that bad.
 
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That does suck, but it's not difficult to simply stop wearing certain clothing types. I understand the reason for a system like that, even if it's going a little too far.
 

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